Øresund Bridge

Øresund Bridge

 

Source:Wikipedia

 

The Øresund Bridge is an impressive structure and its opening has done a lot to improve Malmö’s economy. In fact some people joke that Malmö should have the postcode Copenhagen M, as 25,000 Danes live in the city and its only 25 minutes away from the centre of Copenhagen.

The Øresund Bridge opened in the year 2000 and is 8km or 5.5 miles long, with a 490m or 1,600ft free span, making it the world’s longest cable stayed bridge for both road and railway. Every day thousands of passengers cross the bridge by road and rail, with 19,000 road vehicles making the journey each day. The Øresund Bridge’s pylon’s tower 204m or 663ft above sea level and are the tallest manmade structures in Sweden.

The area where the bridge is connected to Sweden, called Stenören, has been artificially built of compressed garbage. The bridge has been designed so it doesn’t alter the flow of oxygen in the water, from the Øresund into the Baltic, so as not to damage fish stocks.

At the far end of the bridge, on the Danish side, the road and railway line, which is hung under the road bridge, diverge with the road entering a tunnel, on the artificial island of Peberholm. This takes the road vehicles under the sea, with them re-emerging at the motorway junction for Copenhagen Airport. When Peberholm was built, there was no plant or bird life there. Today there are over 450 species of plant life and 15 species of bird that  use the island.

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